Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

The illiterate of the future, it has been said, will not be the man who cannot read the alphabet, but the one who cannot take a photograph.



Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

But must we not also count as illiterate the photographer who cannot read his own pictures?      



Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

The remarkable thing about these pictures, however, is their emptiness.   

 


Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

So much for the snapshot. 

Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

The camera becomes smaller and smaller, ever readier to capture transitory and secret pictures which are able to shock the associative mechanism of the observer to a standstill. 

Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

On the other hand, photography cannot do without people.

Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

The city in these pictures is empty in the manner of a flat which not yet found a new occupant.

Young faces of our time, 2016
Unseen Philosophy project
David Zijlstra

But it was no longer a portrait. What was it?

Young faces [...] it was no longer a portrait, what was it? is geïnspireerd op Walter Benjamin’s filosofische essay A short history of photohraphy (1931), over de geschiedenis en betekenis van de fotografie. De onderschriften bij de portretten zijn citaten uit Benjamin's essay.

1931

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